If you have experienced sexual harassment, there is no right or wrong way to feel or be. What has happened is not your fault and you're not alone. Your safety and wellbeing are the most important things right now and you can access specialist support, if and whenever you feel ready.

Report

It’s your choice. It's completely up to you whether or not to report what's happened. No-one else can or should make that choice for you. 

  • Report to the University and get Support. Students and staff can report an incident using the University’s Report and Support system. You can choose to do this anonymously or you can request support from an adviser. If you choose to talk to an adviser they will be able to talk through the options and support available to you, in confidence. 
  •  University Policies. If you choose to make a formal complaint to the University about a student or member of staff there are procedures which set out the steps you'll need to follow. 
  • Police Some forms of sexual harassment might also break criminal law, in which case you can report to police. In an emergency or if you are in immediate danger you should dial 999.  Otherwise, you can call 101, report online or visit your local police station to report a crime. 
Reporting is a big decision and all of the support services linked to above can support you with this, if you decide to make a police report. 

University Support 

For Students 
  • Student Life Adviser. An adviser can talk through the University's procedures, how to make a complaint and what support is available, in confidence. 
  • Residential Life Team. Whether it is your neighbourhood Student Services Resident (SSR) or the Duty SSR, if you are living in UEA residences there is someone to talk to.   
  • The uea(su) Advice Service is a free, confidential service. Advisers can support students who have been named in a disciplinary report for breach of the General Regulations for Students, and can talk through the procedure, what options are available and help you complain if you are unhappy with the process.
  • Exceptional circumstances. If you feel your studies have been affected by what has happened you can consider applying for exceptional circumstances.

For Staff
  • Human Resource Adviser. An adviser can talk through the options available whether the incident involved another staff member at UEA, a student, or a visitor to campus. 
  • Employee Assistance Programme. This free 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year service is available to all UEA staff. The programme offers confidential support independent from UEA, with professional consultation, counselling, information, resources and referrals to services in your local area.

External Support 

  • Speak to a friend. Talking things through with someone you trust can sometimes help. 
  • Victim Support provide support  to all victims of sexual violence, including specialist support for young victims, male victims and those experiencing it within same-sex relationships.
  • Sue Lambert Trust. A Norfolk based charity that provides support for survivors of sexual abuse. 
  • Galop is an LGBT+ anti-violence charity who support people who have experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse.  They also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.
  • Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) provide some further information on unlawful harassment. 
  • Citizens Advice provide further information on sexual harassment.
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There are two ways you can tell us what happened