If you have experienced hate, there is no right or wrong way to feel or be. What has happened is not your fault and you're not alone. Your safety and wellbeing are the most important things right now and you can access specialist support, if and whenever you feel ready.

Report 

It’s your choice. It's completely up to you whether or not to report what's happened. No-one else can or should make that choice for you. 
  • Report to the University and get Support. Students and staff can report an incident using the University’s Report and Support system. You can choose to do this anonymously or you can request support from an adviser. If you choose to talk to an adviser they will be able to talk through the options and support available to you, in confidence. 
  •  University Policies. If you choose to make a formal complaint to the University about a student or member of staff there are procedures which set out the steps you'll need to follow. 
  • Police If you want to report a hate incident directly to the police, you can call the non-emergency number 101, report online or visit your local police station to report a crime. If you are in immediate danger, always all 999.
Reporting is a big decision and all of the support services linked to above can support you with this, if you decide to make a police report. 

University Support 

For Students
  • Student Life Adviser. An adviser can talk through the University's procedures, how to make a complaint and what support is available, in confidence. 
  • Residential Life Team. Whether it is your neighbourhood Student Services Resident (SSR) or the Duty SSR, if you are living in UEA residences there is someone to talk to.   
  • The uea(su) Advice Service is a free, confidential service. Advisers can support students who have been named in a disciplinary report for breach of the General Regulations for Students, and can talk through the procedure, what options are available and help you complain if you are unhappy with the process.
  • Exceptional circumstances. If you feel your studies have been affected by what has happened you can consider applying for exceptional circumstances.

For Staff
  • Human Resource Adviser. An adviser can talk through the options available whether the incident involved another staff member at UEA, a student, or a visitor to campus. 
  • Health Assured - Employee Assistance Programme. This free 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year service is available to all UEA staff. The programme offers confidential support independent from UEA, with professional consultation, counselling, information, resources and referrals to services in your local area.

External Support 

  • Speak to a friend. Talking things through with someone you trust can sometimes help. 
  • Citizens Advice provides some useful information on the different types of harassment and hate crime people may experience. 
  • True Vision offers guidance on reporting hate crime and hate incidents. If you do not wish to talk to anyone in person about the incident or wish to remain anonymous, there is an online form for reporting hate crime; you can report non-crime hate incidents to the police to try and prevent any escalation in seriousness. 
  • Disability Equality NW runs the Developing from the Negatives Project (DFN), which aims to raise awareness of Disability Hate Crime and encourage reporting. 
  • Tell MAMA supports victims of anti-Muslim hate and is a public service which also measures and monitors anti-Muslim incidents. 
  • Community Security Trust (CS) helps those who are victims of anti-Semitic hatred, harassment or bias. 
  • Stop Hate UK provides independent, confidential and accessible reporting and support for victims, witnesses and third parties.
  • Stop Hate in Norfolk (SHiN) is a a resource for everyone who wants to work towards tackling Hate in Norfolk.
  • Victim Support. If you report a crime to the police, they should automatically ask you if you would like help from an organisation like Victim Support. But anyone affected by crime can contact them directly – you don’t need to talk to the police to get Victim Support help. 
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There are two ways you can tell us what happened